Lie

A preacher colleague of mine messaged me on Facebook this week.  He wanted to tell me I was on a list of people who have not claimed their big check from Such-and-Such Government Agency.  After discovering that he did not know two of his own daughters, confirming my suspicions of a hack, I told him I had reported him to Facebook.

Who is my brother?

One of my Facebook “friends” (actually a complete stranger to me — social media makes for odd relationships) posted the following last week: “Don’t you dare tell me who I can call my brothers and sisters in Christ!  That is way above your pay grade!”

I was tempted to respond, “Is it above yours?”

A few words on baptism

I could go on and on indefinitely regarding my brother in Christ and fellow Bible student Jesse Winn — particularly regarding some of the specific issues he raised recently regarding the things he has come to “believe” about faith in Jesus.  If anyone would like to discuss a particular point of interest with which I have not fully dealt, I will be more than happy to do so in a different forum.  I believe I have made my general points I have made about differences of doctrine within the body of Christ and how to deal with them.  I will limit my specific points regarding such differences to one specific: baptism.

Receiving Jesus

I was called on the carpet recently for using the term “receiving Jesus” — a term frequently used by those in the denominations to refer to finding grace, particularly in the absence of baptism or any other concrete act of obedience.  I then caught myself saying it twice in the very next sermon I preached, so I suppose the observation is valid.

Thanksgiving

The problem with having a day on the calendar specifically dedicated to the giving of thanks is twofold: one, we are tempted to save our expressions of thanksgiving for “the day”; two, when that day arrives, we wind up repeating ourselves.  How can something so sacred be ignored and cliché at the same time?  And how do we avoid them both?