Brisket

My beloved Texas A&M University puts on an annual two-day barbecue seminar.  “Camp Brisket” shows a fortunate few dozen participants the finer points of trimming, preparing and serving the best barbecue in the world.  And here I am in Pensacola, Florida, drooling, surrounded by well-intentioned but sadly ignorant folks who think “good barbecue” used to oink.

But then, perhaps the locals don’t appreciate brisket properly because they are geographically, and thus culinarily, impaired.  Is it their fault, after all, that they have never been taught properly?  It is a rather arduous, painstaking, and time-intensive process, after all; briskets don’t just jump out of the meat case at Publix pre-smoked.  Not good ones, anyway.

I say, yes.  Yes, it is their fault.  I sympathize greatly, but I must speak truth.

Information is available.  Reliable witnesses abound.  Most of my readers have the ability, if properly motivated, to gas up the family van and cross the border into what Texans proudly call “a whole other country.”  To borrow from Proverbs 23:23, ‘Buy truth, and do not sell it.”

Of course, that refers to God’s truth, which brings me to my point.  The “power of God for salvation” (Romans 1:16) is available.  You can find it.  You can have it.  And unlike brisket, it’s free.  You cannot plead ignorance, heritage or geography.  You cannot blame parents, professors or the government.

So no more excuses.  Go find the real thing.  You’ll know it because it doesn’t need any sauce.  Fill yourself full, rest up, then go back for more.  There’s nothing like it.