Blindfolded

I have not seen Bird Box, the Sandra Bullock film on Netflix everyone seems to be talking about.  And maybe it’s just as well.  Because there seems to be a trend of people trying to drive blindfolded.  After all, Sandra Bullock did it.  And she’s a movie star.  Surely that makes it a sensible thing to do.

To be fair, it’s reasonable to assume I have only heard of the blindfolded driving situations that went horribly wrong.  That said, I can’t imagine how “right” such things can go.  The best possible result is that nothing remarkable happens.  I do that every day.  Without a blindfold.

But that’s not really fair, is it?  “The best possible result” in the mind of the Bird-Boxers is to have an adrenaline rush unlike anything they have ever experienced.  There are too many safety measures on roller coasters, bungee jumps and every other thrill permitted by law.  We have to push the envelope.

When cars are engineered to do everything possible to save passengers’ lives, and especially when Daddy will spring for a new Beemer to replace the last one he bought the Bird-Boxer, the downside seems minimal.  So he trains himself to believe thrills are safe, and quickly he becomes inured to them and go seeking greater thrills.  Eventually he destroys himself.  There is no other possible result.

Is it any wonder we have trouble convincing the younger generation to fear hell?  They don’t fear anything else.  They buy merchandise that proudly preaches, “No Fear.”

But God is real.  You must fear God (Ecclesiastes 12:13).  And hell is real.  You must fear hell.